UTD Study Shows What
Influences Employee Commitment

A new study shows that when subordinates have more experience or education than their supervisors, they are less likely to respond to their boss’ leadership styles.

UTD Study

A new study conducted by the Naveen Jindal School of Management at The University of Texas at Dallas shows that when subordinates have more experience or education than their supervisors, they’re less likely to respond to their boss’ leadership styles.

“Transformational leadership is supposedly the best type of leadership to inspire followers,” Orlando Richard, UT Dallas associate professor of organizations, strategy, and international management, said in a release.

“But what happens when your boss is less experienced or younger than you? You are less likely to respond to their leadership style. It also affects the level of commitment you have to the organization because you feel you are more qualified than they are.”

The study in both the U.S. and Turkey showed that status conflicts weakened the relationship between transformational leadership and affective commitment, according to the news release.

“From an HR standpoint, I think it’s important to make sure that you have the right leader in place because if employees feel that the wrong person is in charge, there could be negative consequences for the organization down the road,” Richard said. “No one wants to work for someone who they feel doesn’t have the credentials.”

Additionally, the study explored transformational leadership style and gender. In Turkey, men were penalized more strongly than women if they didn’t have as much education or experience and vice versa for the U.S.


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